Galen Barry successfully defended his dissertation, "A Dissertation Forged in Hell: An Account of Power and Possibility in Spinoza". Congratulations, Galen!

November 06, 2014 -- manager

Galen Barry successfully defended his dissertation, entitled "A Dissertation Forged in Hell: An Account of Power and Possibility in Spinoza", on October 15th.  Congratulations, Galen!

Gwen Nally successfully defended her dissertation, "Good Beliefs, Bad Arguments: Pragmatic Reasons in Plato's Dialogues". Congratulations, Gwen!

August 19, 2014 -- manager

Gwen Nally successfully defended her dissertation, entitled "  Good Beliefs, Bad Arguments: Pragmatic Reasons in Plato's Dialogues"  .  Gwen will be teaching at the University of Richmond beginning this fall.

PHIL1510

Does God exist? Is it rational to believe in God? Does reason, experience, or science show that God does not exist. Or is it the opposite? Is there a compelling practical reason to believe in God? These are the questions that we will consider in this class. We will take a philosophical approach to questions concerning God and religion.We will mainly focus on various arguments for and against the existence of God, and arguments for and against the view that it can be rational to believe in God.

PHIL1510

The central aim of this course is to give students the opportunity to examine philosophical issues surrounding the institution of punishment and in doing so to give them a more general introduction to moral, political and legal philosophy. In the first unit we will explore the two major moral theories: Consequentialism and Deontology. A basic knowledge of these theories will be necessary to understand the standard attempts to justify punishment.

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